Please help... Meralgia paresthetica

Discussion in 'UK Cheerleading Training' started by SirPsychoSilver, Nov 9, 2018 at 11:57 AM.

  1. SirPsychoSilver

    SirPsychoSilver New Member

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    I have Meralgia paresthetica, numbness in thigh caused by a compressed nerve, and the doctor prescribed an inflammatory medication that helped temporarily but it's back to how it was. I just want it to go away, it's been like this for months. Stretching seems to have helped more than anything but it's always hit or miss on what I'm actually stretching because I don't know what I'm doing.

    Does anyone have any kind of stretching advice for this? Some hip stretches or thigh stretches? Ab stretches? I don't know, I need help and I'm so lost.
     
  2. DrRQuincy

    DrRQuincy New Member

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    I am a stranger on the internet and not your doctor, so take this with a grain of salt: Physical therapy doesn't have any proven benefit in this disorder. If it has been months, you should go back to a physician. Maybe some different medications, or nerve injections/ surgical decompressions may be warranted.

    Basics though: lose some weight if you are heavy, wear loose pants and underwear.
     
  3. -Allaina-

    -Allaina- New Member

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    I have/had this as well. In the beginning I had extreme pain in this are, which then turned into complete numbness. After lots of physical therapy what helped me was a combination of different things.

    Using a foam roll on my glutes and (if I could stand it) my IT Band and using this exercise .

    We also worked on my posture issue during this time. I can't pinpoint the exact time it went away, as I was already happy the pain went away and just decided to live with the numb area. It basically suprised me one day when I realized I could feel someone touching my leg.

    I also wore a lot of looser clothing during this, as before I was always wearing skinny jeans.

    Maybe this is a little bit helpful to you. I am not a doctor or physical therapist, so I would also recommend going back to those and discuss your options with them.
     
  4. ashalee

    ashalee New Member

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    I have nerve damage and take gabapentin for it. I don’t know if that would work for you, but it might be worth asking your doctor.
     
  5. LikeRidiculous

    LikeRidiculous New Member

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    Hi. I'm an MD.

    Edit: I agree that PT might help, and I'm not a rehab specialist nor a flexibility specialist so I will leave the rest to these fine people on this post :)

    This isn't something we run into commonly, but I have seen it a few times. There is no ONE fix for it. See below for recommendations. This was copied from something called UpToDate, which is essentially a subscription Wikipedia for medical issues that many physicians use to look things up that they don't see often.

    **TREATMENT** — Meralgia paresthetica is a self-limited, benign disease in most patients. Spontaneous remission is frequent \[[2](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/m...moral-cutaneous-nerve-entrapment/abstract/2)\]. The goals of treatment are to reassure the patient that this is not a serious condition and to recommend ways to reduce pressure over the nerve in the groin area. Local glucocorticoid injection is used infrequently in patients with refractory symptoms. (See ['Nerve blockade'](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/m...&selectedTitle=1~21&display_rank=1#H9) above.)

    Better than 90 percent of patients respond to conservative measures alone, although recurrent symptoms are common \[[13,20](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/m...l-cutaneous-nerve-entrapment/abstract/13,20)\]. Rarely, surgery is necessary.

    **Acute therapy** — The acute therapy of meralgia paresthetica includes the following:

    ●Educate the patient that the disorder does not represent a serious back problem

    ●Advise the patient to avoid tight garments

    ●Discuss the need for weight loss if appropriate

    Physical therapy does not play a significant role in the management of this disorder. Abdominal toning exercises may reduce pressure over the nerve but are of unproven value.

    **Persistent symptoms** — In patients with persistent symptoms for more than one to two months, despite the above measures, reexamine the dysesthetic area to confirm the local nature of the problem. Anticonvulsants such as [carbamazepine](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/carbamazepine-drug-information?source=see_link), [phenytoin](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/phenytoin-drug-information?source=see_link), or [gabapentin](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/gabapentin-drug-information?source=see_link) can be helpful in reducing neuropathic pain symptoms.

    Consultation with an anesthesiologist for a local nerve block can also be considered. Injection of a local anesthetic agent, glucocorticoid, or both can be useful to temporarily treat this neuropathy \[[19,21,22](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/m...utaneous-nerve-entrapment/abstract/19,21,22)\]. (See ['Nerve blockade'](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/m...&selectedTitle=1~21&display_rank=1#H9) above.)

    Rarely, surgery is necessary in patients with severe chronic symptoms that are refractory to more conservative measures \[[23](https://www.uptodate.com/contents/m...oral-cutaneous-nerve-entrapment/abstract/23)\].
     

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