Shoulder flexibility / impingement syndrome

Discussion in 'UK Cheerleading Training' started by bakerstreetstorytime, Oct 23, 2018.

  1. bakerstreetstorytime

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    Hey guys,
    My husband's got impingement syndrome in his left shoulder and nothing has helped so far. It's been a problem for over 4 years now and is troubling him in his every day life and at night.
    He's fairly muscular and is already doing lots of excercises for his shoulder, arms and back. But seeing this sub made me think that flexibility (or lack thereof) could be the problem.

    What kind of excercises would you suggest?
     
  2. EloyFalcon

    EloyFalcon New Member

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  3. Leg4cee

    Leg4cee New Member

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    I would guess in the first picture your limiting factor is your triceps, specifically the long head. In the second picture it could be your pectoralis major.

    ​

    And, answering your question, it does not look as if you were inflexible.
     
  4. Howeveritsdone

    Howeveritsdone New Member

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    Try Tread the Needle with a bound twist. Even just doing thread the needle will get you some flexibility that is hard to achieve for shoulders... It takes a minute or two a day and will make a difference!

    [
     
  5. wild3hills

    wild3hills New Member

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    Bendy! How are you entering the pose - pushing up or dropping back? If you are pushing up, I would recommend switching the technique, because the act of going up and back gives me more space to bend, getting the hands closer in a way that walking them in from pushing up does not.
     
  6. AnimalChild

    AnimalChild New Member

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    A shoulder girdle muscle that is often overlooked is subscapularis. It originates in the subscapular fossa and inserts into the lesser tubercle of the humerus, as well as the shoulder capsule itself.
    It internally rotates and adducts the shoulder, and for a lot of people the last bit of shoulder external rotation and abduction can be limited by a tight subscap.
     

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